Blogs

Blog 77 – Get More Cash Value With Unscheduled PUAs

A lot of our clients are concerned and ask many questions about the guaranteed cash values in IBC policies. We want to make absolutely sure that you understand all the assumptions behind the guaranteed values in these policies.

Blog 76 – Guaranteed Cash Values In IBC Policies

A lot of our clients are concerned and ask many questions about the guaranteed cash values in IBC policies. We want to make absolutely sure that you understand all the assumptions behind the guaranteed values in these policies.

Blog 75 – Infinite Banking And College Education

The number one concern of most of our clients with young children is how they can assist their children with their college education without affecting their retirement plans.

Blog 74 – Why Doesn’t Everyone Practice The Infinite Banking Concept (IBC)?

Some people are doing quite well financially, and they feel that what they are doing is working fine for them. They have the mistaken opinion that since they feel they are doing well, there is no room for improvement, or to try something they may not be familiar with. Therefore, they are not interested in learning anything about IBC.

Blog 73 – Short-Term Versus Long-Term Cash Values In IBC Policies.

Why do the premiums paid exceed the cash value during these first years? Well, it is due to the initial costs of setting up the death benefit and the compensation paid to the financial professional who designs, sells, and will service the policy for years to come. This is what Nelson Nash calls “the capitalization phase of the policy”. Insurance companies call this initial cost, acquisition cost.

Blog 72 – How Much And For How Long You Should Contribute To Your IBC Policy.

The question always arises as to what is considered a reasonable contribution. We use the following rule-of-thumb: if you are younger than 21 years old, reasonable contribution should be a minimum of $300 per month (or $3,600 per year); if you are between 21 and 30 years old, it should be the larger of $500 per month (or $6,000 per year) or 10% of your gross annual family income; if you are between 31 and 40 years old, it should be the larger of $1,000 per month (or $12,000 per year) or 10% to 15% of your gross annual family income; if you are between 41 and 50 years old, it should be the larger of $1,500 per month (or $18,000 per year) or 15% to 20% of your gross annual family income; if you are between 51 and 60 years old, it should be the larger of $2,000 per month (or $24,000 per year) or 20% of your gross annual family income; if you are older than 60 years old, it should be either $2,500 per month (or $30,000 per year) or a lump sum larger than $200,000.

Blog 71 – Don’t Delay Implementing IBC

We have been Financial Professionals for 26 years, and during the last 12 years, we have dedicated exclusively to the design of high cash value dividend-paying whole life insurance policies.

Blog 70 – Key Questions About The Infinite Banking Concept

1)What is the Infinite Banking Concept?
The Infinite Banking Concept (IBC) is an exceptional cash management tool for your personal economy or for your business that gives you financial independence by recapturing interest payments that otherwise would flow to outsiders.

Blog 69 – Is Social Security Income Taxable?

Blog 69 – Is Social Security Income Taxable?
According to the Social Security website, some of you have to pay federal income taxes on your Social Security benefits.

Blog 68 – The Term Rider Of An IBC Policy

One of the key pieces of information that a prospective client shares with us is the monthly or annual contribution that he/she would like to make to his/her Infinite Banking Concept (IBC) policy.

Once we know the original contribution to the policy, including the modal premium, (annually or monthly), and the age, gender, and the underwriting rating of the insured, we determine the minimum amount of death benefit necessary to make sure that the policy does not violate the Modified Endowment Contract (MEC) regulations.

Blog 67 – The Capitalization Phase Of An IBC Policy

Prospective clients need to realize that the cumulative break-even may take a few years due to the initial cost of setting up the death benefit of the policy and the compensation to the financial professional who designs, sells and will service the policy for years to come. That is what Nelson Nash calls the capitalization phase of the policy.

Blog 66 – Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Paid-Up Additions – Part 5

Up to the late 1980s, policy owners could place an unlimited amount of discretionary capital into a life insurance policy. All this changed in 1988 with a new law known as the Tax and Miscellaneous Revenue Act of 1988 or TAMRA. This law established a qualification test for life insurance contracts based on the amount of premium paid each year to the policy. If the premium is too large under the guideline, the policy fails the test and no longer enjoys life insurance status. It is then reclassified as a Modified Endowment Contract or MEC and it loses several tax favorable features enjoyed by life insurance contracts.

Call Now Button